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Computing Probability Density Function Assignment Help Using MATLAB

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Table Of Contents
  • Histogram Approaches to Probability  Density Functions and Probability Mass Function
  • PMF for a single fair die
  • Comparing Sample Mean and Variance with Analytical Values

Histogram Approaches to Probability  Density Functions and Probability Mass Function

This project will explore how a histogram approaches a probability density function (pdf or PDF) or a probability mass function (pmf or PMF) for a random variable and illustrate how to use the pmf/pdf to compute probabilities.

HISTOGRAMS, PDFS AND PMFS
By now, you should all know about histograms, after all, we discussed them in ENES101. We take a large collection events from multiple independent repetitions of a specific experiment, assign numbers to those events by means of a random variable, and then sort the values of the random variable into bins, counting the number in each bin. If we divide the number in each bin (i.e., the value of the histogram in that bin) by the total number of independent trials, we form a naïve estimate of the probability that the value of the random variable falls in that bin. Clearly, if we sum up all of these estimates, we should compute exactly 1.000…, because we will have accounted for all of the trials. Thus, in a simple view, the scaled histogram represents the scaled probability density function (if the random variable is continuous) or the probability mass function ( if the random variable is discrete). As the number of trials increases, the histogram should more and more closely approach the analytical pdf or the analytical pmf , where and represent the center of the bin.

PMF for a single fair die

Using the MATLAB function randi(imax, m, n) , model the number of dots showing on a fair six-sided die. In this case the number of dots – that is, resulting random integer – is the random variable. Each element of the returned matrix of values is one trial. Generate histograms using 120; 1200; 12,000; 120,000 trials and generate the scaled histogram, as described above. In each case, compute the (sample) mean and (sample) variance of your trials.

For those programming in a language other than MATLAB, randi(imax, m, n) creates an array of random integers in the range of 1 to imax.

Hint: use the appropriate MATLAB functions for this! Discuss your observations as the number of points increases. How do the histograms vary (or not) from what you expect. As shown in the figure 1 to figure 4, by increasing the trial, the mean and variance values is fitted to the expected values.

Comparing Sample Mean and Variance with Analytical Values

For this problem, the analytical expected value, or mean, is , and the analytical variance 2.9167. How do the (sample) mean and (sample) variance compare with the analytical values?

As Figure 4 shows, with 120000 trial, the mean and variance is calculated 0.166 and 2.9228 which is in accordance with the analytical values.

PMF for a single fair die

Figure 1. 120 trial (mean=0.166 and vaiance=2.6048)

PMF for a single fair die 1

Figure 2. 1200 trial (mean=0.166 and vaiance=3.0075)

PMF for a single fair die 2

Figure 3. 12000 trial (mean=0.166 and vaiance=2.9159)

PMF for a single fair die 3

Figure 4. 120000 trial (mean=0.166 and vaiance=2.9228)

PMF for a single fair die 00

PMF for binary strings

Figure 5. P1=0.5 and m=20

PMF for binary strings 1

Figure 6. P1=0.5 and m=200

PMF for binary strings 2

Figure 7. P1=0.5 and m=2000

PMF for binary strings 3

Figure 8. P1=0.5 and m=20000

PMF for binary strings 4

Figure 9. P1=0.1 and m=20

PMF for binary strings 5

Figure 10. P1=0.1 and m=200

PMF for binary strings 6

Figure 11. P1=0.1 and m=2000

PMF for binary strings 7

Figure 12. P1=0.1 and m=20000

PMF for binary strings 8

Figure 13. P1=0.9 and m=20

PMF for binary strings 9

Figure 14. P1=0.9 and m=200

PMF for binary strings 10

Figure 15. P1=0.9 and m=2000

PMF for binary strings 11

Figure 16. P1=0.9 and m=20000

PMF for binary strings 13

PMF for binary strings 14

PMF for binary strings 15

Figure 17.exponentially distribution with10 trial

PMF for binary strings 16

Figure 18.exponentially distribution with100trial

PMF for binary strings 17

Figure 19. exponentially distribution with 1000000 trial

PMF for binary strings 18

PMF for binary strings 19

PMF for binary strings 20

Figure 20. with 10 trial

PMF for binary strings 21

Figure 21. with 100 trial

PMF for binary strings 22

Figure 22. with 100000 trial

PMF for binary strings 23

PMF for binary strings 24

Figure 23. with 10 trial

PMF for binary strings 25

Figure 24. with 100 trial

PMF for binary strings 26

Figure 25. with 100000 trial

PMF for binary strings 27

PMF for binary strings 28